header i-Italy

You chose: roberto saviano

  • photo by Alessio Jacona
    For most of us, Roberto Saviano, 39, is one of Italy's great modern heroes. The author of the gangland investigative book and movie "Gomorrah" has lived under armed escort for 11 years, but has tangled with the new Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, with literally grave risks to his life..
  • It is no surprise that anti-immigrant rhetoric is a vote getter. Latest opinion polls show that the Lega of Matteo Salvini, just now threatening to expel the Romani ethnic people, or Roma, has overtaken Luigi Di Maio's Movimento Cinque Stelle, even though in national general elections only three months ago the Five Stars won 15% more than the Lega.
  • Main characters of the Netflix series "Suburra." From left to right: Aureliano "Numero 8" Adami (Alessandro Borghi), Gabriele "Lele" Marchilli(Eduardo Valdarnini), Alberto "Spadino" Anacleti (Giacomo Ferrara)
    The Italian television market is making its mark on the international community with creative and exhilarating shows that deviate from tradition. Demands from the global media landscape have prompted local content providers to step up their game. The Italian series breaking into the Netflix platform serve as just one example of this.
  • Lavishly praised throughout the English-speaking world and somewhat more controversial at home, Neapolitan author Elena Ferrante is a literary phenomenon whose identity is an enigma. Her name is a pseudonym, and the author has chosen to keep his/her identity an enigma. For whatever reason, Ferrante is never photographed, never interviewed in person, but solely and occasionally by email.
  • The Italian satire was awarded the second-place grand prize at the closing ceremony of the 65th edition of the celebrated international film festival. Starring a convicted murder, Aniello Arena, the film tells the story of a Naples fishmonger obsessed with reality TV.
  • Saviano is right. Silence is not the answer; protesting dramatic portrayals of mafiosi is not the answer. Italian Americans have spent more time and money fighting fictional mafiosi than they have fighting real mafiosi in their midst.
  • Op-Eds
    Jerry Krase(December 21, 2011)
    In the second of a series of commentaries by Italian-American intellectuals on Roberto Saviano's recent talk about Mafia at the New York University, sociologist Jerome Krase “agree(s) wholeheartedly with Saviano, that in order to escape from ‘unbearable’ anti-Italian prejudice of which they are victims, those people who label themselves or are labeled by others as ‘Italian Americans’ should ignore the lucrative excesses of the likes of David Chase, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese but instead learn and share the reality rather than the reality shows of Italian and Italian American history.” However, he adds: “Saviano seems not to know the ‘American’ version of the Italian scene. As do others, he expresses an Italocentric view of both Italians and Italian Americans. Unfortunately, Italians are as little interested in the real Italian American experience as Italian Americans are in the real Italy.”
  • NYU. Roberto Saviano - In Italy the best anti-mafia law in the world
    In the first of a series of commentaries by Italian-American intellectuals on Roberto Saviano's recent talk about Mafia at the New York University, George DeStefano holds that Italian American anti-defamationists outraged by Mafia movies and TV shows should adopt the Italian approach, choosing candid and historically-informed discourse rather than ethnic defensiveness.

Pages