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Articles by: Judith Harris

  • The record left by Sergio Marchionne, for 14 years the head of what is now Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), is indelible. But in the outpouring of admiring obituaries are a few unanswered questions. Marchionne, 66, died July 25 in a hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, of two heart attacks in the wake of a operation on his shoulder.
  • Chairman & CEO of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Sergio Marchionne
    Sergio Marchionne's condition is "irreversible," according to the hospital in Zurich where he is in intensive care. And on July 21 Fiat Chrysler chairman, John Elkann, 42, wrote a wistful semi-obituary letter to the company's 236,000 employees, reminding them that it was Marchionne's "intellect, perseverance and leadership that saved Fiat."
  • Ivrea, Ponte Vecchio
    The city identified with Olivetti, the manufacturer of office machines since it was founded in 1896, is Italy's 54th to be accorded World Heritage status by UNESCO. For Adriano Olivetti, factory owners were to respect the workers' whole life, and not only the assembly line
  • "Bufala"
    In Italian the word "bufala" means, not mamma buffalo, as in "mozzarella di bufala," but a "whopper" or, in today's jargon, fake news. No less than anywhere else, bufala whoppers are roaming through the news ranges of Italy.
  • photo by Alessio Jacona
    For most of us, Roberto Saviano, 39, is one of Italy's great modern heroes. The author of the gangland investigative book and movie "Gomorrah" has lived under armed escort for 11 years, but has tangled with the new Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, with literally grave risks to his life..
  • It is no surprise that anti-immigrant rhetoric is a vote getter. Latest opinion polls show that the Lega of Matteo Salvini, just now threatening to expel the Romani ethnic people, or Roma, has overtaken Luigi Di Maio's Movimento Cinque Stelle, even though in national general elections only three months ago the Five Stars won 15% more than the Lega.
  • Drawings and paintings by child migrants from an exhibition opening this week at Rome's National Gallery of Modern Art
    When 629 migrants were en route by sea to Italy on June 10, Interior Minister Matteo Salvini declared that no Italian port could accept them. "Saving lives is a duty, but turning Italy into Europe's refugee camp, no," he stated. Spain is to take them in, but the EU is splintered on this.
  • The current political, fiscal and constitutional crisis in Rome, the most serious since the murder of Aldo Moro forty years ago, can only gather steam with the calling of new elections. With the collapse risk of its Palace of Justice and the results of the last administrative elections, the city of Bari in the meantime becomes the mirror of the current Italian political plight. The new elections set for June 10 will be a test of things to come.

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