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  • Little Italy’s Italian American Museum hosted a seminar on “The Mediterranean Diet: Present, Past and Future,” featuring presentations by experts on the subject. The seminar occurred on the heels of the passage of a new law in Calabria that looks to promote the Mediterranean Diet in relation to Nicotera, the birthplace of the Diet.
  • Rocco Totino
    Rocco Totino. Left: the hall of the Grassi and Co. firm in Madison Avenue
    i-Italy was invited to a special encounter embodying the relationship between Italy and the United States in a way that goes beyond usual official pronouncements. It was a unique meeting of professionals whose expertise is essential to the success of both economies, but who rarely have a chance to collaborate. We’re referring to the meeting held in the New York office of the leading accounting and consulting firm Grassi & Co. between Italy’s CNDCEC (Consiglio Nazionale dei Dottori Commercialisti e degli Esperti Contabili) and their American counterparts. Here we present a two-part conversation with its organizers: the Italian, Paolo Siniscalco, and the American, Rocco Totino. The two leading accountants are joining forces to help professionals and businessmen who need to understand better the workings of Italian and American laws and financial practices.
  • Paolo Siniscalco
    Paolo Siniscalco. To the right: The building of Siniscalco & Partners in Rome
    i-Italy was invited to a special encounter embodying the relationship between Italy and the United States in a way that goes beyond usual official pronouncements. It was a unique meeting of professionals whose expertise is essential to the success of both economies, but who rarely have a chance to collaborate. We’re referring to the meeting held in the New York office of the leading accounting and consulting firm Grassi & Co. between Italy’s CNDCEC (Consiglio Nazionale dei Dottori Commercialisti e degli Esperti Contabili) and their American counterparts. Here we present a two-part conversation with its organizers: the Italian Paolo Siniscalco, and the American, Rocco Totino. The two leading accountants are joining forces to help professionals and businessmen who need to understand better the workings of Italian and American laws and financial practices.
  • Just weeks after celebrating his 1,000 days in office, a postwar feat matched by only four previous postwar governments, Premier Matteo Renzi faces a tough constitutional reform referendum Dec. 4. The risk is that the vote will be read as for or against Renzi himself.
  • Antonin Scalia
    Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Antonin Scalia
    Stony Brook University’s Center for Italian studies, directed by professor Mario Mignone, organized a conference to remember Justice Antonin G. Scalia, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1986-2016). Presenters discussed both their experiences with the Supreme Court Justice and the influences he has had on the Italian-American community and the American Judicial System.
  • Even as Italian fire fighters brought up more bodies this morning from the moral as well as physical abyss off the isle of Lampedusa, a battle over the Italian law governing immigration rages. Of the over 500 known to have been aboard the ship that burned early Thursday, 143 bodies were recovered while another 220, and possibly more, have been identified inside the sunken ship today. This latest tragedy means that Italy's harsh immigration law is under severe scrutiny.
  • When you hear talk in a Roman trattoria of “Porcellum”, the diners are not discussing the pork roast on the menu—they’re talking politics. The back story is that after the current election bill became law, the man who wrote it, Roberto Calderoli of the Northern League, either shamelessly or carelessly called it“una porcata”, which Google’s free translation service puts into English as “crap.” Taking Google at its literal word, this means that the law which gave the present parliament and senate their seats and salaries is called in English “the crap law.” Political analyist Giovanni Sartori dressed it up a bit by putting it into Latin. Ever since the law is universally known as the Porcellum, suddenly under discussion because, after countless vague hints and blackmail-style threats, early elections begin to appear a real possibility. The signs are everywhere, but nowhere clearer than in the continuing concerns over ratings and the effectiveness (or not) of the new emergency budget.
  • Facts & Stories
    Jerry Krase(December 13, 2009)
    The recent trials and tribulations of American-Italian Amanda Fox, and Italian Americans John A. "Junior" Gotti, and Joseph Bruno raise some important questions about the differences between law and justice here (qua) and there (li).