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  • Massimo and Lella Vignelli. Photo Credit Fred R. Conrad
    There’s an Italian hand behind the iconic designs of the New York and Washington subway maps and lettering, or the logos of companies like American Airlines and Bloomingdales: it is the hand of designers Massimo and Lella Vignelli. The Embassy of Italy in Washington, the Italian Cultural Institute and the Rochester Institute of Technology, celebrate the genius of the Vignellis in an exhibition opening on March 16 that will be on view until April 29, 2018. The opening event will include a lecture, among the others, by R. Roger Remington, Professor of Graphic Design at the Rochester Institute of Technology and a video-interview with Massimo Vignelli by the Editor in Chief of i-Italy, Letizia Airos introduced by Renato Miracco, Cultural Attaché of the Italian Embassy in Washington. We had the chance to talk with Emanuele Amendola, Director of the Italian Cultural Institute in DC, who shared with us his enthusiasm about the exhibition and the influence of the Vignellis on modern design.
  • “Lella Vignelli, a Designer With a Spare, Elegant Style, Dies at 82” wrote The New York Times a couple of days ago. The digital magazine Quartz summarizes in a few words the story of the famous couple, Lella and Massimo Vignelli, and their difficult battle against the flow: “A legendary husband-and-wife design team fought to get her equal credit for 40 years.” To remember Lella, we decided to re-publish our article about Designed by: Lella Vignelli—a book of love that her husband Massimo edited in 2013, just few weeks before passing away. The book is a compendium of Lella’s contributions to design. Born out of a conversation with Massimo, our longtime friend, the article was entitled “The Realist and the Dreamer,” where “The Realist” was Lella—not his muse, but his wife and life-long professional partner. Massimo wanted the book to be an inspiration to all women, and circulated it free on the Internet. “For years,” Massimo wrote in his introduction, “the collaboration between female architects and designers and their partners has been under-appreciated …” And, he maintained, Lella had always been the hard rock behind his dreams: “consistent throughout her career; unfailingly intelligent; rigorous, not arbitrary; timeless, not trendy.”
  • 1) Miu Miu, Blugirl
    Yes, it’s coming again. Another year has passed, and here we are, ready to let the magic of Christmas fill our souls and hearts. Because let’s be honest, everyone loves Christmas, right? Its lights, its colors, and the general sense of love and happiness that is able to warm up even the coldest of hearts. And while Christmas trees and all sorts of decorations are already filling up every corner of our houses - we also couldn’t help but think about fashion.
  • Furla's Flagship Store on Fifth Avenue
    Art & Culture
    Tommaso Cartia(November 22, 2016)
    After Furla’s record- breaking achievements all over the world and its breakthrough in the oriental market, the company—currently exporting to 71 countries— was in search of the perfect place to maximize its brand’s footprint in the US. A natural choice, the new flagship boutique recently opened in New York City on Fifth Avenue, the most glamorous shopping street in the world. We sat down with Scott Link, CEO of the Americas, to talk about Furla’s new adventure in the US.
  • Art & Culture
    Letizia Airos(May 04, 2016)
    In conversation with Ferrari’s vice-president of design, Flavio Manzoni. How is a new Ferrari born? Synergy between designers, engineers, and technicians is at the heart of the famous Maranello automaker’s continued success. At Ferrari Design they have adopted a special method that allows designers to step outside their purely stylistic roles and have a say in selecting projects, the common goal being the manufacture of excellence.
  • Design Week: Once again New York is overwhelmed with events, panels and fairs about the international design week, which never cease to amaze. Much space is dedicated to the young and creative. “Made in Italy” offers elegance and originality. We specifically focused on “Collective Focus: Italy”, which ends on Sunday May 17th. The exhibition, curated by the editor of W magazine Stefano Tonchi, took place at the futuristic Skylight Clarkson. You’re still in time to experience the breathe in the fresh air of Italian and international design.
  • Oscar night is not complete if there isn't at least one Italian winner: and this year the honor went to Costume Designer Milena Canonero, for the costumes of Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel. Although it didn't take home the top honors The Grand Budapest Hotel tied the winning film, Birdman, for the number of wins with four.

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