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  • "I am in L’Aquila from New York to visit my parents, who now live 6 miles from the historic center, where they used to own a beautiful old apartment. The apartment is still there, with just a couple of lesions in the living room, but is condemned like the rest of the town. There is no rebuilding effort in place (...) The hundreds of people gathered to remove the debris from the middle of the square in L’Aquila are no strangers to politics. Theirs is a form of protest against the decision to turn the town into a large landfill after the earthquake of last April 6."
  • Facts & Stories
    Judith Harris(February 16, 2010)
    SNAP/SHOTS ITALY. A leaked wiretap from investigations into suspected irregularities in the post-quake reconstruction in Abruzzo, shows a cynical dialogue among two eminent builders anxious for juicy contracts.
  • "Bitter Spring" - Stan Pugliese talks about Ignazio Silone
    An interview with Stanislao G. Pugliese, Professor of History at Hofstra College and author of “Bitter Spring: A life of Ignazio Silone.” The controversial Italian writer—loved and hated in his country by anti-communists and anti-fascists alike—is studied in this book from historical, literary, and human perspectives.
  • Riccardo Muti led a free concert in L'Aquila for survivors of the earthquake. The conductor, between engagements in Salzburg and Chicago, directed an all-Abruzzese scratch orchestra and chorus of three hundred, including students from the famed conservatory here, itself severely damaged
  • Life & People
    Simona Zecchi(April 21, 2009)
    As I slept soundly in my bed, I could not understand what that noise was: tinkling, shaking, bumping. I thought my dreams were overwhelming reality. The shake went far beyond normal settling for me to misunderstand it...
  • Half a century ago, famous Italian novelist Ignazio Silone wrote about the 1915 earthquake in Abruzzo. He commented that what happened afterwards -- the reconstruction -- because of the way it was done, appeared as "a far greater calamity than the natural cataclysm." We are re-publishing that passage here as a contribution to a better understanding of the discussions that are developing in Italy today.

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