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  • What is a genocide and how does it occur? This is a question that we Italians can and should ask as Remembrance Day (January 27th) approaches again this year. We should ask ourselves if what e remember and how we remember is enough. And, we should take into consideration the sense of saturation that this institutional recurrence can provoke in some of us. Can we try to ask some new historiographical questions this year, seventy years after the beginnings of the deportation from Italy? Is the category of genocide useful for the historical interpretation of the Holocaust in Italy, and specifically of the Italian participation in the deportations and extermination of Jews in 1943-45?
  • EDITORS' NOTE: Mr. Jasha M. Levi, a Yugoslav Jewish antifascist in the 1930s and a fighter against dictatorships and genocides for all his life, fled the Nazis and his native Sarajevo for Italy. Here he—as a foreigner whose whereabouts remained unknown "to the Nazis and their Italian collaborators"—was spared "the cruel fate suffered by Italian Jews deported in cattle cars from Milan or burned in a crematorium in Trieste." Mr. Levi, who recounted his personal experience in a political memoir, "Requiem For A Country," asked i-Italy to publish the following short essay. In complying with his request, we believe that his balanced personal account not only, as he concludes, "does not diminish the memory of the eight thousand murdered Italian Jews," but may actually contribute to a better understanding of their tragedy—of which Italians, as a government and as a people, bear a collective historical responsibility, despite the good that some of them may have done in helping hundreds like Mr. Levi to survive.
  • Facts & Stories
    Letizia Airos(January 25, 2012)
    On the occasion of the Remembrance Day, i-Italy publishes again this interview released on 27th January 2009. An encounter with journalist Andrea Fiano, member of the Board of Directors of the Primo Levi Center (NYC). He is the son of Nedo Fiano, an Auschwitz survivor, and the father of Talia, an Italian American teenager
  • Facts & Stories
    Maria Rita Latto(January 22, 2011)
    Tullia Zevi died Saturday at the age of 92. She was one of the historic post-war leaders of Italy's Jews and the only woman to ever hold the post of president of the country's Jewish communities. i-Italy met her two years ago. It was an honor for us. Here we re-publish that interview, where she talked about her life and her anti-Fascist militancy in New York.
  • Life & People
    Letizia Airos Soria(January 31, 2009)
    An encounter with journalist Andrea Fiano, member of the Board of Directors of the Primo Levi Center (NYC). He is the son of Nedo Fiano, an Auschwitz survivor, and the father of Talia, an Italian American teenager
  • Interview with Anthony Julian Tamburri, Dean of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute (CUNY): "As an Italian in the US you were automatically identified as a Catholic; but then you were also a Jew, so a 'minority within a minority'..."
  • The former President of the Union of Italian Jewish Communities: "We need to build a world where all the national, linguistic, and religious groups become aware that there all are, in fact, minorities..."
  • The Consul General of Itlay in New York opens i-italy's special issue dedicated to Remembrance day: "Italy does not forget. We still feel shame that this occurred in our country."
  • Facts & Stories
    The Editors(January 27, 2009)
    A special issue of i-Italy dedicated to Remembrance Day. For an uncompromising critique of racism, past and present - in Italy, in America, and everywhere in the World.

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