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Articles by: Emily Hayes

  • Giorgio Spanu, Nancy Olnick, Ilaria Bernardi, Massimo Bartolini
    The Embassy of Italy and the Italian Cultural Institute in Washington D.C. hosted a conversation on new trends in Italian Art. The panel, New Directions: Italian Contemporary Art in the United States, featured curator Ilaria Bernardi and artist Massimo Bartolini, along with Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu, co-founders of Magazzino Italian Art, a museum in the Hudson Valley dedicated to Post-war and Contemporary Italian Art
  • Life & People
    Emily Hayes(October 16, 2018)
    For two days every year, the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel swells with Italian voices, music, and food for the National Italian American Foundation’s (NIAF) Anniversary Gala weekend. October 12 and 13 of this year were no different. Pugliese wine, olive oil, and sauce was enjoyed by eager Italian Americans looking for a taste of their culture at the Expo Italiana, and gala attendees gathered to honor Italian Americans who have contributed greatly to American business, science, government, and the arts.
  • Powerful vibrato and soaring arias echoed through the Embassy of Italy on the evening of Monday, September 24, revitalizing the classic opera La traviata by Giuseppe Verdi. The Italian Cultural Institute and the Washington National Opera (WNO) presented a special preview of this famous story of love and of sacrifice, which debuts at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC on October 6.
  • From the left: Director Laura Bispuri and Actress Alba Rohrwacher
    On Tuesday, April 23, the Embassy of Italy hosted an all-women conversation on Italian contemporary cinema with Italian Director Laura Bispuri and Italian actress Alba Rohrwacher, moderated by the President of the Italian Film Journalists Association, Laura Delli Colli. Bispuri and Rohrwacher arrived in the nation’s capital straight from the Tribeca Film Festival to present "Figlia Mia" (Daughter of Mine) at Filmfest DC.
  • Sharing images of paintings and sculptures by the greatest artists of the time was not as easy as pressing a button on an iPhone during the Renaissance. Jamie Gabbarelli, curator of prints, drawings, and photographs at the Rhode Island School of Design’s Museum of Art, argued during his lecture at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. that Renaissance innovation with prints broke with the past in crucial ways. His exhibit currently in the West building of the National Gallery explores the question of what happens when an image is shared with the world.
  • From the L: R. Roger Remington, Professor of Graphic Design from the Vignelli Center for Design at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Emanuele Amendola, Director of the Italian Cultural Institute in DC and Professor Elisabetta d’Amanda, also from RIT
    The Vignelli legacy is one that lives within the structure of New York City, and consists of simple, elegant designs that laid the basis for modernism in the United States. Massimo Vignelli and his partner Elena Valle (Lella) Vignelli conceived an iconic world of items, logos, and spaces for their international clients. Important pieces from their archive were open to the public at the Embassy of Italy in Washington, D.C. on March 16, for a lecture and exhibit opening entitled L’eredita’ dei Vignelli. The event was hosted by the Italian Cultural Institute, the Embassy of Italy, and the Rochester Institute of Technology.
  • Art & Culture
    Emily Hayes(November 05, 2015)
    he American artist Nathan Sawaya is currently in the ancient city of Rome, showcasing his rather modern large-dimension Lego block sculptures. Located in the Spazio Eventi Tirso (SET) gallery, the show “The Art of Brick” opened this past Wednesday, October 28.
  • Art & Culture
    Emily Hayes(April 24, 2015)
    For about two weeks in June 2016, wrap artist Christo will create floating walkways to wind around Italy’s Lake Iseo in the Lombardy region, connecting the mainland to and surrounding Italy’s largest land island, Monte Isola. Viewers can also walk around San Paolo Island and the mainland town of Sulzano. The bright yellow fabric used for the walkways will continue on the streets in two mainland towns.
  • With the Expo Milano 2015 kick off date only a week away, many Italians are concerned that Milan will not be ready to host the 20 million people that are getting ready to file into the city for sixth months, the length of the world’s fair. The New York Times is not the only newspaper to recently release an article concerning the many controversies that have permeated the atmosphere of the Expo and Italy’s international image.

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