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You chose: cuomo

  • He was always better at jump rope and hopscotch than me, and I was better at basketball and stickball, but I didn't know this was a sign that would both break and heal my heart. Excerpt from Annie Lanzillotto's upcoming book: "L Is For Lion: An Italian Bronx Butch Freedom Memoir" SUNY Albany Press, Feb 2013.
  • Everyone is talking about the new New York State law that gives non-heterosexual couples the right to get married, but the belated law is really about recognizing homosexuals as what they are --- people. Unfortunately, the right to marry law needed the ideological right to get passed.
  • The President of Italy, Giorgio Napolitano, has awarded the first mom and the first sister of the state of New York, Matilda and Margaret Cuomo, with the titles of Grand Officer and Commander of the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity in recognition of their roles in promoting Italian language and culture.
  • «NOW THEREFORE, I, Michael R. Bloomberg, in recognition of the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy, and in appreciation of the millions of people of Italian heritage who have called our City home, do hereby proclaim Sunday, March 27th, 2011 in the City of New York as: 'NYC Celebrates Italian Unification Day'»
  • After the signing
    Art & Culture
    A.B. & M.D.M.(November 11, 2010)
    Together at the Consulate General of Italy to celebrate the signing of the agreement that reinstates the Advanced Placement Program in Italian Language and Culture.
  • Given the unfortunate hot breakfast drink metaphors "Tea Party" and "Coffee Party" that have been brewed to simplify the already simple-minded partisan political debate in American politics over the past year, I have resorted to a "Cappuccino" allusion in this column to ask the non-musical question: “What does the election of Andrew Cuomo mean for New York State’s Italian Americans?" My informed guess is that, like his father Mario, Andy knows he owes little to the Italian American voter.
  • Op-Eds
    Jerry Krase(October 13, 2010)
    This year's reflection on the Columbus Day Parade in New York City has become much more problematic as at least one of the Italian American characters who was proudly marching in it has attracted more flak than Christopher did in 1992. To find out who it was you must read the rest of the article.
  • Two (or perhaps three) people with Italian-sounding last names are simultaneously running for governor of the State of New York. This means that Italian American voters will have to decide between them. My advice to them is find out on which side your bread is buttered and which one of them would butter it better as governor.