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Articles by: Judith Harris

  • Dream of Venice. Photo by Eugenio Novajra
    The battle against the big ships that overwhelm Venice and its canals with tourists is being fought by politicians and groups of irate citizens. But it is also being fought in photographs and books that celebrate the city and its traditions.
  • Ten vicious shootings of migrants and Roma in Italy have left one man dead and a baby at risk of paralysis. For this "huge increase in cases of violence and racism," Italy is under investigation by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights of Man.
  • Schools are about to reopen for Italy's students, although not without problems. Some towns have lost school buildings due to earthquakes while others complain of a shortage of teachers. A bitter controversy is over vaccinating the very youngest.
  • Still deep in shock from the tragic collapse of the Morandi Bridge, Genoa nevertheless is soldiering on. From Mayor Marco Bucci to ordinary citizens, the Genovesi must look ahead to build a viable future for themselves and their children.
  • Wall fresco, Priapus
    For the ancient Greeks and Romans, the image of Priapus represented the origin of life itself, plus good luck and business success. Now, during consolidation work at Pompeii, archaeologists discovered a fresco painting of Priapus, weighing on a scale his huge phallus against a pile of coins.
  • The record left by Sergio Marchionne, for 14 years the head of what is now Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), is indelible. But in the outpouring of admiring obituaries are a few unanswered questions. Marchionne, 66, died July 25 in a hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, of two heart attacks in the wake of a operation on his shoulder.
  • Chairman & CEO of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Sergio Marchionne
    Sergio Marchionne's condition is "irreversible," according to the hospital in Zurich where he is in intensive care. And on July 21 Fiat Chrysler chairman, John Elkann, 42, wrote a wistful semi-obituary letter to the company's 236,000 employees, reminding them that it was Marchionne's "intellect, perseverance and leadership that saved Fiat."
  • Ivrea, Ponte Vecchio
    The city identified with Olivetti, the manufacturer of office machines since it was founded in 1896, is Italy's 54th to be accorded World Heritage status by UNESCO. For Adriano Olivetti, factory owners were to respect the workers' whole life, and not only the assembly line

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