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Articles by: Chiara Basso

  • "Mozzarella Mamma" Trisha Thomas (Credit: Nicolee Drake)
    Living the Italian Dream - Part II. After hearing from Americans who moved to Italy as retirees, we talked with expats who have lived in the country for over two decades: Trisha, who is raising three children in Rome while trying to become "a good Italian mamma," and Alexandra, who moved to Florence to study the Renaissance and stayed for her Italian husband and "the quality of life." Part III next week will feature the stories of three men and their love affair with la Dolce Vita.
  • According to Peter Stastny, director of the documentary "Redemption Blues," redemption “is reaching out for something that you cannot reach, but at least you make the effort,” while music, in particular playing with other Jewish musicians in New York, is that personal “place where you can move forward in a Jewish way even if you are not religious.” In his movie, presented yesterday at NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo’, Stastny explores what redemption means for the last survivors of the Holocaust. Often people who belong to the second generation, like him, feel the weight of that tragedy, the Shoah, but might spend their life with parents or relatives who never wanted to talk about what happened, like the director’s mother.
  • Lisa Condie
    Living the Italian Dream - Part I. Many Americans are fond of Italy and Italian culture to the point that some of them decide to move to Il Bel Paese. It can happen at any stage in life. Lisa Condie and Valencia Wolf sold their belongings and embrace the sweet Italian lifestyle after retirement. This is the first part of a series dedicated to American expats. Next week, we will tell you the story of Americans who have been living in Italy for over 20 years.
  • For a decade, the Consulate general has organized this annual public reading to remember the about 3000 people who were forced to leave Italy often among indifference. We asked people and authorities who attended the commemoration why it is important to remember. “Not to repeat” was the common response. Yet the fear of the “others” and indifference seem still present beyond the rhetoric.
  • “They think it’s easy to make a cut or a hole. But it’s not true,” Fontana (1899–1968) said once. “You have no idea how much stuff I throw away.” The Argentinian-Italian artist famous for his “holes” (buchi) first and from 1958 for his “cuts” (tagli) is in the spotlight in New York thanks to two major events, a retrospective at the MET Breuer and an exhibition at the Italian Cultural Institute.
  • View of Sambuca in Sicily (Simon Padovani | Shutterstock)
    The possibility of buying a house in the scenic Sicilian town of Sambuca for about $1 made headlines in many outlets, from CNN Travel, which broke the news, to The New York Post and The Guardian. Within 48 hours of the story being spread, local officials have been inundated with tens of thousands of inquiries from people hoping to buy their piece of rural Italy. But what is it like living there as an outsider? We talked with journalist Paola Caridi who moved there in 2008 after 12 years in the Middle East.
  • Are eggs part of the Mediterranean diet? And Parmesan cheese? Is it true that you can have all the olive oil you want in a Mediterranean diet? The answer to all these questions is “not true.” The Mediterranean diet is one of the most famous dietary plans but there are still a lot of misconceptions on what it is and what it implies. Professor Maurizio Trevisan told us everything we should know about this topic. The best way to start a healthy 2019.
  • Finalists during the third and last round of the Colavita Culinary Challenge (Photo credit: Iwona Adamczyk)
    Facts & Stories
    Chiara Basso(January 14, 2019)
    No culinary TV show could match the enthusiasm of both participants and public at the final round of the first-ever Colavita Culinary Challenge that took place at the Food and Finance High School (FFHS), the only culinary high school in New York City.
  • From Andria, Puglia, to a luxury store on Fifth Avenue where Hollywood stars are regular customers. Italian designer Domenico Vacca is grateful to be born in a relatively small city of only 100,000 inhabitants in Southern Italy like Andria, but when you dream big like him you want to leave as soon as possible. “The first big step for me was going to Milan where I worked as a lawyer at the multinational law firm Baker McKenzie” explains the fashion designer who has dressed celebrities such as Dustin Hoffman, Daniel Day Lewis and Angela Bassett. Vacca’s family didn’t want him to work in fashion because, according to his grandmother, this business is a lot of work and not so much money. But, eventually, he followed his passion with a mission: showing Americans "how to dress the authentic Italian way." Next dream to realize? Hollywood.

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